French inspection and classification company Bureau Veritas has presented new regulations for systems with wind propulsion. They are intended to encourage transition of carbon-free propulsion systems for the new-day vessels.

According to the sources, new rules for systems with wind propulsion will be based on their previous version, published by BV in 1987.

Currently, two new sets of indications of classification requirements have been presented for vessels with wind power supply: one notation – for vessels with standing ropes and the other one – both for standing and running ropes. These rules contain directions as to combination of loads and measures for different types of technologies with wind propulsion.

Among other issues, new regulations present the major classification structure for technologies with wind propulsion.  First of all, at the project analysis phase, safety provision and interoperation with on-board systems are dwelled upon. The other point refers to operational duration with consideration of control rules and maintenance specifications.

Common requirements that should be dwelled upon:

  • Investigation and determination of potential risks and dangers
  • Determination of combination of loads and extreme situations
  • Determination of automation systems
  • Determination of the influence of systems with wind propulsion on the safety characteristics of a ship
  • Strength checkout in terms of interconnection of systems with wind propulsion power and different appliances on a ship.

Moreover, new regulations call for operating instructions, including restrictions of working principles of systems with wind propulsion according to the design. 

Despite the fact that the wind power can not always be available, it can definitely favor reduction of greenhouse gases. Systems with wind propulsion can be used both as additional and main source of energy supply. 

Currently, Bureau Veritas is engaged in a number of projects connected with the wind propulsion. 

The classification society is trying to cope with the difficulties of energy transition in terms of safety and risk issues as well as requirements for future fuels.